Mister Twister’s Poc’it Shake’R and Poc’it Fry – potent drop-shot plastics

Chris Berzas Photo Mister Twister Pro-staffer Winston Michel shows the results of fishing the Poc’it Shake’R on a drop-shot rig – a quality Louisiana Atchafalaya Basin largemouth.
Chris Berzas Photo
Mister Twister Pro-staffer Winston Michel shows the results of fishing the Poc’it Shake’R on a drop-shot rig – a quality Louisiana Atchafalaya Basin largemouth.

Getting bass to bite what you throw is the real deal especially when there’s high stakes toward filling the livewell.

And Mister Twister’s quality plastics are an integral part of any bass angler’s arsenal in making sure that happens.

Options abound in techniques using Mister Twister lures, and one that’s readily able to get bass to bite when they’re suspended is the art of drop shotting.

This technique can actually be used 12-months-a-year, yet bass anglers are more eager to use a drop-shot rig during the summer and fall.

The drop-shot rig is especially useful later in the morning and during the afternoon when bass and their prey suspend to more comfortable thermoclines.

 

Mister Twister Pro-staffer Winston Michel’s drop-shot technique – Atchafalaya Basin, Louisiana

Take 41-year-old, Mister Twister Prostaffer Winston Michel of Pierre Part, Louisiana, as an example of an angler who has enjoyed success using this technique.

Michel and teammate, Sandy Gaudet, were deep in competition catching bass for the livewell during a tournament in Louisiana’s Atchafalaya Basin.

“We had some success early throwing bladed swim jigs by flipping them toward trees and working them back,” Michel said.

“But the swim jig bite didn’t last.”

Michel then adjusted by picking up his rod tied with a drop-shot rig complete with Mister Twister’s Poc’it Shake’R and finished the limit needed to place in the tournament.

“I use the Poc’it Shake’R regularly, always having a rod with it tied on to a drop-shot rig,” the angler said.

“It’s a great bait when fishing points and the mouths of runouts.”

Chris Berzas Photo Michel’s drop-shot setup is common, and he employs this technique on medium-light spinning equipment. The angler first ties his fishing line to a 2/0 or 3/0, thin wire, wide-gap hook with a palomar knot. The angler leaves enough of a tag end (12 to 18 inches) to tie a cylindrical tungsten weight. Before the weight is attached, he will first run the tag end back up over the top and insert it through the eye of the hook thus allowing the hook to stand straight out. On the end, Michel then ties on one of a variety of sizes of tungsten cylindrical weights ranging from 1/8 to ¼ ounces. He’ll then Texas-rig a Poc’it Shake’R using a color relative to the quality of the water.
Chris Berzas Photo
Using spinning equipment, Michel ties his fishing line to a 2/0 or 3/0, thin wire, wide-gap hook with a palomar knot. The angler leaves enough of a tag end (12 to 18 inches) to tie a cylindrical tungsten weight.
Before the weight is attached, he will first run the tag end back up over the top and insert it through the eye of the hook thus allowing the hook to stand straight out.
On the end, Michel then ties on one of a variety of sizes of tungsten cylindrical weights ranging from 1/8 to ¼ ounces.
He’ll then Texas-rig a Poc’it Shake’R using a color relative to the quality of the water.

Michel’s drop-shot setup is common, and he employs this technique on medium-light spinning equipment.

The angler first ties his fishing line to a 2/0 or 3/0, thin wire, wide-gap hook with a palomar knot. The angler leaves enough of a tag end (12 to 18 inches) to tie a cylindrical tungsten weight.

Before the weight is attached, he will first run the tag end back up over the top and insert it through the eye of the hook thus allowing the hook to stand straight out.

On the end, Michel then ties on one of a variety of sizes of tungsten cylindrical weights ranging from 1/8 to ¼ ounces.

He’ll then Texas-rig a Poc’it Shake’R using a color relative to the quality of the water.

The rest of his dropshotting tackle includes a 7-foot, 1-inch Swamp Stix medium-action spinning rod and a Quantum Exo spinning reel. He also uses 20-pound FINS braid with a 10- or 12-pound, 14-foot fluorocarbon leader to attach his drop-shot rig to.

“If there is just a little stain in the water, I’ll use the chartreuse-pepper-red Poc’it Shake’R,” he said. “If I’m fishing darker waters, I’ll be using a junebug-red or watermelon-red Poc’it ShakeR.”

Besides points and runouts, Michel will also target deep-water humps and ledges with his drop-shot setup.

“I especially like that the Poc’it Shake’R is 6 ½ inches long and tapers at the end making its tail flutter and twitch easily,” he said.

“The bubbles coming from the embedded pocket in the Poc’it Shake’R also add an advantage in getting bass to hit it.”

Michel will work the drop shot on a tight line just barely moving the tip of his rod.

“You’ll be surprised with the action it provides when I just twitch that rod tip a little,” he said.

The angler has no trouble catching weight on his setup – fish ranging 2 ½ to 4 pounds.

“It’s a very good option I have to target bass ranging out a little deeper when it gets tough,” the angler said.

 

Mister Twister Pro-staffer Joe Carpenter’s drop-shot style and technique – Caney Lake, Louisiana

 

Photo courtesy of Joe Carpenter Joe Carpenter, a Mister Twister Pro-staffer from Quitman, Louisiana, has had his share of success with his drop-shot rig using Mister Twister’s Poc’it Fry.
Photo courtesy of Joe Carpenter
Joe Carpenter, a Mister Twister Pro-staffer from Quitman, Louisiana, has had his share of success with his drop-shot rig using Mister Twister’s Poc’it Fry.

Another Mister Twister Pro-staffer, Joe Carpenter of Quitman, Louisiana, also uses a drop shot rig yet with another versatile Mister Twister plastic – the 4 ½-inch Poc’it Fry.

The 44-year-old angler spends much time in recreational and competitive angling pursuits on Caney Lake, a Trophy Bass Lake so designated by the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Bass weighing in the double digits are taken regularly here each year, and as a result fishing pressure is a force to be reckoned with on this popular reservoir.

Due to the pressure, Carpenter uses any technique and method he can in order to get an edge on catching Caney Lake bass – especially when fishing competitively.

“I’ll never forget fishing one tournament on Caney,” he said. “Another angler was fishing a finesse worm nearby, and we were both catching small fish.

“I took my garlic, chartreuse marker out and made one wide ring in the middle of the Poc’it Fry,” he said. “Then I attached it to my drop-shot rig on my spinning rod and started catching better fish.

“Although I didn’t win that tournament, I did end up placing third.”

Photo courtesy of Joe Carpenter Mister Twister Pro-staffer Joe Quitman applies garlic-chartreuse dye to the middle ring of a Poc’it Fry and fishes it wacky style on his drop shot.
Photo courtesy of Joe Carpenter
Mister Twister Pro-staffer Joe Quitman applies garlic-chartreuse dye to the middle ring of a Poc’it Fry and fishes it wacky style on his drop shot.

 

Carpenter’s drop-shot setup is simple and he uses a beaded swivel and VMC Spinshot Drop-Shot Hook, usually a No. 2.

“I will tie a palomar knot at each end of the swivel,” he said. “But the swivel and hook is actually one piece.

“Then I place the chartreuse-garlic ring of the Poc’it Fry wacky-style on the hook of the drop shot rig.”

Carpenter attaches his drop-shot rig to an 8- to 10-pound McCoy’s copolymer leader on 30-pound PowerPro braid. He spools this to a Team Lew’s high-speed spinning rod sitting on a 7-foot, medium-action Quantum Smoke rod.

The angler said that his rig was something new that bass weren’t seeing at the time and gave him some advantage.

“You can use this when the fish are pressured, or anytime they’re stacked up or suspended in brush,” Carpenter said.

“I think it works so well because of the bubbles that stream from the pockets. Also, the Poc’it Fry is a little bulkier and hangs well when fished wacky style on a drop-shot rig.”

As for colors, Carpenter uses green pumpkin and watermelon color variations of the Poc’it Fry.

The angler has also taken quality bass ranging upward to 6 pounds on the Poc’it Fry on his drop-shot setup.

For certain, the art of drop shotting is a very effective practice bass anglers can use toward a heavy livewell.

And using Mister Twister’s quality plastics such as the Poc’it Shake’R and the Poc’it Fry make using this technique even better.

 

Look for the Poc’it Shake’R, the Poc’it Fry and other quality Mister Twister lures at your favorite tackle dealer or online retailer.

You can also find more information about the Poc’it Shake’R, Poc’it Fry and all Mister Twister lures at www.mistertwister.com.

You May Also Like

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: