Jetty redfish rock on!

Eric Ellison Photo Bobby Burns shows his Sabine Jetty brute red measuring 31 1/2 inches and weighing 12 pounds taken when fishing dingy waters.
Eric Ellison Photo
Bobby Burns shows his Sabine Jetty brute red measuring 31 1/2 inches and weighing 12 pounds taken when fishing dingy waters.

In Gulf Coast estuaries, a lot of rain must fall.

April showers make that happen, although torrential rains are maligned by many coastal anglers.

But the ecological benefits of such an influx of freshwater coursing through the deltas far outweigh the perceived malignancy.

River sediment eventually reaches the marsh recharging its fertility to provide more flora, fauna and fish.

But such also brings out the beast.

Brute redfish come charging in numbers along the shorelines and into the marshes where their abundant prey is moving forced by the inundation of fresh water.

Earlier this month in the muddy, murky Sabine Estuary, Capt. Eric “Cornmeal” Ellison found feisty battles with these mighty, bronzed warriors

The 40-year-old charter guide was fishing along with client, Bobby Burns, near the jetties of Sabine Lake on the Louisiana/Texas border.

“We caught and released 24 redfish in 3 hours, and only 8 were in the slot (20 to 28 inches),” Ellison said.

“The rest were over.”

The anglers were fishing the eastern rock walls of the jetty in drop-offs, and the reds were stacked up.

Eric Ellison Photo Capt. Eric "Cornmeal" Ellison displays a beasty 34 1/2 inch Sabine Lake jetty redfish weighing 14 .5 pounds
Eric Ellison Photo
Capt. Eric “Cornmeal” Ellison displays a beasty 34 1/2-inch Sabine Lake jetty redfish weighing 14 .5 pounds.

“Schools of shad and mullet were going out with the tide,” he said. “And the redfish were clobbering them.”

“Bobby and I had doubles on at times.”

The anglers had their reel drags singing and their lines metering out with the deep thrusts of these fish.

“It was game on,” Ellison said. “We normally see more reds on the northern part of the lake, but the freshwater had both the reds and the baitfish down south.

“We had a great morning.”

The anglers’ plastics of choice were white diamond and Mardi Gras Egret Baits’ 5-inch Wedgetail Mullets attached to 1/8-ounce Yellowmouth jig heads.

“That vibrating tail on the Wedgetail works very well to get their attention,” he said.

“With the lighter jig heads, we were slow-rolling the Wedgetails and letting them drop in 5 to 10 feet of water.”

The anglers also hooked several on Rat-L-Traps and deep-diving crankbaits.

“We let the crankbaits dive to 15 feet and then let them flutter to the top. They got bit on the way up,” Ellison said.

Ellison’s Wedgetails and crankbaits were tied to 30-pound FINS braid spooled to Lew’s reels seated on Lew’s rods.

“The 16 larger redfish were between 26- and 36-inches in length,” he said.

For information on Capt. Ellison’s Charter services, visit his website at www.captcornmeal.com.

To find Egret Baits’ 5-inch Wedgetail Mullets, visit your local dealer to include Simon Outfitters in Orange, Texas, or online at www.egretbaits.com.

 

 

 

 

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